February 22, 2014
stefaniejasper:

"Blooming…" by Stefanie Jasper
?

stefaniejasper:

"Blooming…" by Stefanie Jasper

?

(via russellstyles)

9:45am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Ze5Z_p18AHWIW
  
Filed under: photography 
February 22, 2014

The Boston Wool Trade Association / Philadelphia Wool and Textile Association Baseball Trophy, 1912-1916

History

The Boston Wool Trade Association was formed in November 1911. At their first annual outing in Boston in August 1912 members of the Philadelphia Wool and Textile Association were guests of the Boston association. Golf, tennis and a baseball game were on the schedule of activities.


The baseball game was played between the Boston Wool Trade baseball team and the Philadelphia Wool and Textile Association baseball team. This silver trophy was presented to the winning team by the Boston Wool Trade Association. It was donated by Charles J. Webb of Philadelphia. Mr. Webb was one of the organizers of the Philadelphia Wool and Textile Association and held the office of treasurer for that group. The Philadelphia team won the game. The score was 2 to 1.


The second outing was held in Philadelphia on September 19, 1913 where the Philadelphia Wool and Textile Association played host to one hundred and seventy five members of the Boston Wool Trade Association. The two associations alternated where the outing was held between Boston and Philadelphia. A program of activities that included golf, tennis and baseball as well as field sports such as relay races were on the program for each outing as well as a dinner and speeches.


The baseball game was held at the Stenson Avenue Athletic Club where 500 people came to watch the game. Philadelphia won again with a score of 19 to 2 according to the information on the trophy (which varies from the 19 to 1 score as reported in the September 27, 1913 publication “Fibre and Fabric”). The following excerpt is from that article about the event:
"Charles J. Webb was called upon to say a few words in acceptance of the baseball cup for the Philadelphia Association since it was Mr. Webb who donated it. He stated that under the terms of the gift Philadelphia was entitled to hold the cup, having won it twice in succession, but that instead it would be donated to a permanent contest between the two associations. In connection with the afternoon’s game, Mr. Webb stated that hereafter no applicant for a position in a Boston wool house would be asked if he could sell wool, but rather, could he play baseball."
That amusing observation was apparently due to the rather large margin by which Philadelphia had won the game.


The textile groups’ 1916 outing was in Boston on Friday, September 15, 1916. Six hundred were in attendance which was considerably more than the 470 who were expected to attend. One hundred and twenty five to one hundred and fifty were members of the Philadelphia association who were guests of the Boston association. The outing was held at the Tedesco Country Club, Phillips Beach, Massachusetts with dinner at the Copley Plaza Hotel. There were 550 reservations made for dinner.


The baseball game was at 2 PM. From an article about the outing in the Sept. 23, 1916 issue of Textile World Journal: “Few of those who witnessed the ball game were aware that the natty appearance of the Boston team was due to the new suits provided by Chairman Frank W. Hallowell of the Base Ball Committee at his personal expense. Mr. Hallowell is an old Harvard ball player and maintains an active interest in the national sport.” The Boston team won with a score of 17 to 3.


We noticed the absence of the years 1914 and 1915 from the trophy which seemed unusual as it was an annual outing. We did further research and learned that the Executive Committee of the Boston Wool Trade Association canceled the 1914 outing “owing to the terrible conditions now prevailing in Europe and which are liable to grow more serious in the near future.” They stated: “… our local trade as well as our Philadelphia guests could not feel fully justified in attending a day’s festivities with the world’s greatest conflict being enacted almost before their eyes.” The outing must have been canceled again in 1915, probably for the same reason. In the lengthy description of the 1916 outing found in the September 23, 1916 issue of the publication “Textile World” the 1913 outing was mentioned several times but there was no mention at all of a 1915 outing. Nor was there mention of the war in Europe.


In looking for further references to the groups’ outings after 1916, the next one that I could find was in 1920 when the format of the baseball games played was changed to a series of five games, two of which were played in Arlington, Massachusetts at Spy Pond on September 11 and three in Philadelphia at Fleisher’s Field on September 17, 18 and 19. As no dates beyond 1916 were engraved on the trophy, we have concluded that the entry of the U.S. into the war in the spring of 1917 resulted in the groups canceling their annual meetings again and that the meetings were resumed after the war was over.


In 1922 the tenth annual banquet of the Boston Wool Trade Association was held on March 2 at the Copley Plaza in Boston and was attended by 900 members and guests. They had a banquet. speeches, men in ballet outfits jumping out of fake bales of wool, piano playing, making witty repartee, and lampooning prominent members of the wool trade in a mock trial. No sports were on the program. At the banquet they provided a memento in the form of a booklet stamped in gold “1912-1922” which contained the banquet menu, list of association officers, guests, and members and a facsimile of a 1894 letter about the idea for the association.

From the scheduling of the 1922 meeting it is clear that they had decided to hold their meetings in the spring rather than in late summer. And that they no longer included golf, tennis and baseball in the program, sports which would have been impractical to play in March in Boston when snow could still be covering the ground. Thus there would have been no more need to use a baseball trophy as an award.


Due to the trophy having been part of an event where business and events of the time were discussed and then later reported on, our research on the history of the trophy and the textile associations brought up articles that described the political climate of the time, the working conditions of textile workers, the role of unions, the change in hours of the work week, the impact of war, and the concerns of those in the textile industry regarding the environment, politics, business, and law. Some of what concerned them then, particularly issues about the environment, were the same things that concern us now. Other matters, like the reduction in the maximum hours to be worked in a week to forty-eight, were a reminder that there was a time when working conditions in this country were far tougher than they are now and that people took it for granted so much that there was controversy when changes in the law were proposed.

Currently listed for sale in our eBay store.

February 2, 2014
crochet:

(via Getting the hang of it at Merci, Paris « Life.Style.etc)

These aren’t mine but I do collect clothing hangers. There are 3 shown here that I don’t have.

crochet:

(via Getting the hang of it at Merci, Paris « Life.Style.etc)

These aren’t mine but I do collect clothing hangers. There are 3 shown here that I don’t have.

(via focus-damnit)

6:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Ze5Z_p16FIwNP
  
Filed under: collection Antique 
February 2, 2014
hamerman:

super sunday softball  2 Feb 2014

hamerman:

super sunday softball  2 Feb 2014

February 2, 2014
trenord-crush:

Deep in thought.

I find these photographs so appealing. The color, the feeling of being a respectful voyeur of fellow travelers, the light — it all works so well.

trenord-crush:

Deep in thought.

I find these photographs so appealing. The color, the feeling of being a respectful voyeur of fellow travelers, the light — it all works so well.

February 1, 2014
trenord-crush:

My book is closed, I read no more.

Also by means of an iPhone.

trenord-crush:

My book is closed, I read no more.

Also by means of an iPhone.

February 1, 2014
trenord-crush:

trenord-crush:

Questa ragazza leggeva, e con la sinistra era come se dirigesse il tempo della lettura, o il ritmo della pagina, o come se cercasse di riprodurre, o di rendere evidente, il moto prodotto dentro di lei dalle parole che le entravano dentro. Era uno spettacolo bellissimo.

With the left hand, this girl was kind of conducting the book tempo, or the page rhythm. Or, maybe, she was trying to reproduce, or to make evident, the motion of the words penetrating herself.
Originally posted on January 21, 2013

Taken with an iPhone?
I swoon! Well, almost swoon. I like it!

trenord-crush:

trenord-crush:

Questa ragazza leggeva, e con la sinistra era come se dirigesse il tempo della lettura, o il ritmo della pagina, o come se cercasse di riprodurre, o di rendere evidente, il moto prodotto dentro di lei dalle parole che le entravano dentro. Era uno spettacolo bellissimo.

With the left hand, this girl was kind of conducting the book tempo, or the page rhythm. Or, maybe, she was trying to reproduce, or to make evident, the motion of the words penetrating herself.

Originally posted on January 21, 2013

Taken with an iPhone?

I swoon! Well, almost swoon. I like it!

February 1, 2014
Occupational of silver salesman, cabinet photo
Capitol Gallery, Sept. 2013 auction, Lot 66, sold for only $50.
I wish I’d known about Capitol Gallery and their auction!

Occupational of silver salesman, cabinet photo

Capitol Gallery, Sept. 2013 auction, Lot 66, sold for only $50.

I wish I’d known about Capitol Gallery and their auction!

February 1, 2014
Triplet Beer Drinkers, Milwaukee - Cabinet Card
Cabinet Cards, lot 63, Capitol Gallery

Triplet Beer Drinkers, Milwaukee - Cabinet Card

Cabinet Cards, lot 63, Capitol Gallery

February 1, 2014
tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1896, [cabinet card, portrait of a well-dressed young man posed confidently with his bicycle], Cooke
via Capitol Gallery, Cabinet Cards

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1896, [cabinet card, portrait of a well-dressed young man posed confidently with his bicycle], Cooke

via Capitol Gallery, Cabinet Cards

February 1, 2014
"Sometimes people don’t want to hear the truth because they don’t want their illusions destroyed."

— Friedrich Nietzsche (via un-control)

(via bradfarlow)

January 31, 2014
hazedolly:

Composition two-faced doll with feels.

hazedolly, You do find some great ones!!

hazedolly:

Composition two-faced doll with feels.

hazedolly, You do find some great ones!!

(Source: idonotexcist)

January 31, 2014
tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1855-60, [ambrotype portrait of a child on a rocking horse]
via KaufmaNelson Vintage Photographs

Oooooh!!!! Very very nice!!!

tuesday-johnson:

ca. 1855-60, [ambrotype portrait of a child on a rocking horse]

via KaufmaNelson Vintage Photographs

Oooooh!!!! Very very nice!!!

January 31, 2014

Real Photo Postcards & Snapshots of Motorcycles & Riders.

A few early 20th century postcards (RPPC) and snapshots from a collection of motorcycles and riders put together by Jim years ago. Some have been sold and some are available.

Our eBay store: Imajgin

January 30, 2014
On the back is written: “She’s a bear.”
Imajgin eBay Store

On the back is written: “She’s a bear.”

Imajgin eBay Store

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